Why Do Midwesterners Love Storm Watching So Much?

If you are into watching storms roll through, you must really be enjoying yourself lately. You may also consider yourself a ceraunophile, or someone who loves lightning and thunder.

I think there are a lot of people who would file themselves in that category, especially in the Midwest. The second an abnormally dark cloud rolls into our viewing area we are standing under an open garage door with necks craned to the sky. Hearing thunder then counting the seconds between the lightening to see how far away the storm is. Checking the radar on our phones, and of course taking pictures to share with our Facebook friends.

But why is it that we love it so much? Storms are synonymous with danger, so why are we drawn to them like a moth to a flame?

The best explanation that I’ve seen comes from Ambient Mixer:

A thunderstorm is dangerous, that’s a fact, but most people who enjoy it are watching from the comfort of their homes. The chaos that the storm brings enhances the sense of security that their homes provide.

Ambient-Mixer.com

There is actually a word for that feeling, it is chrysalism, which means the amniotic tranquility of being indoors during a thunderstorm.

What this boils down to is the fact that storm watching reminds us of the security we feel while at home. We know that if we need to escape the storm at some point, we are in a position to do so.

Also, I would like to make this argument. Who doesn’t love watching how quickly a storm builds and fades away? Entertainment from Mother Nature at it’s finest and freest.

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